Archive for the Second Brigade Category

4th Pennsylvania Cavalry

Posted in 4th Penn Cav, Regimental Histories on May 12, 2009 by dccaughey

“On the 16th of March, the division was hurried out in light marching order, and proceeded to Morrisville, Va., and encamped there for the night.  They then started early the next morning, and marched to the Rappahannock, at Kelley’s Ford.  Here we found the enemy opposite ready to dispute our passage of the river and the ford.  Below the surface of the water they had placed wires, fallen trees, etc., to obstruct our progress.  But, after a short fight and most gallant charge, by the First Rhode Island cavalry, under Col. Chamberlin, of the First Maine cavalry, the enemy were routed, the crossing effected, and all the rebels in the works on the opposite side captured – consisting of 75 prisoners.  This was not accomplished, though, without considerable loss to the charging party, as they advanced under very adverse circumstances, the ford being small and narrow.  Col. Chamberlin was very seriously wounded, and his life was despaired of for a long time.  The division then crossed the river 1800 strong, Gen. Averill in command.  They were soon met by Gen. Stuart’s and Gen. Fitz Hugh Lee’s rebel cavalry.  We fought very desperately all day, making several fierce charges, one of which our regiment made singly, routing the enemy and driving him in the direction of Culpeper.  This engagementcalled into play only the cavalry forces of the two armies.  It was the first collision, on a large scale, of the mounted forces of the two armies in Virginia, and the first time in which the rebel cavalry had been successfully met and defeated by inferior numbers.  This reconnaissance in force was made under orders from Gen. Hooker, to discover what movements the enemy were about making.  The regiment suffered pretty severely in this engagement, the company losing Corp. Thomas Connor, his father, a fellow-soldier, also being present at the time.  We condoled with him on our common loss.  As a cavalry-man he was wild and daring.”

 Source:  Hyndman, William.  History of a Cavalry Company.  Philadelphia: Jas. B. Rodgers Co., 1870.  Pages 87-88.

Advertisements

16th Pennsylvania Cavalry

Posted in 16th Penn Cav, Regimental Histories on December 1, 2008 by Craig Swain

16th PA Cavalry

 

Abstracts of the Journal of the Regiment

 

March 16, 1863.  Colonel Gregg, with Adjutant Day, Serg’t Major Miller, eight officers, and one hundred and ninety-six men, left camp at 8 A M ; joined the brigade, commanded by Colonel McIntosh, of the Third Pennsylvania Cavalry, and marched to Morrisville, and encamped.

 

March 17, 1863.  Engaged with the enemy at “Kelly’s Ford.”  On arriving at the ford, Colonel Gregg sent forward all the axes in the regiment, and immediately dispatched twenty men of the Sixteenth, under command of First Lieutenant A J Snyder, of “H” Company.  The party bore itself gallantly, and did good service in removing the blockade at the Ford, and crossed with the First Rhode Island men. Sergeant McGowan, “H” Company, Private Claffe, “A” Company, and Saddler F J Cornman, “I” Company, were recommended to the favorable notice of the Colonel commanding Brigade, for their gallant conduct.  The position occupied by the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry was on the extreme right of he line, the right of the Regiment resting on the river; skirmishers thrown forward and deployed at a distance of three hundred yards, and concealed from view by a row of cedar trees and outbuildings.  Shortly after the attack commenced on the left and centre, Colonel Gregg observed a large force of the enemy moving rapidly towards our right, evidently with a view of out-flanking us.  Colonel Gregg dismounted a portion of the regiment and occupied the buildings immediately in his front.  This was not done too soon, as the enemy were already entering the outer gate, when a volley from behind the houses drove them back.  They soon rallied home behind some trees and out of carbine range, and supposing, from their manoevres, that it was their intention to dismount a portion of their men and gain our rear, under cover of the bushes which lined the bank of the river.  Colonel Gregg dismounted the entire command, and threw the whole force some three hundred yards in advance of the houses, under cover of a stone wall, and drove the enemy from their position.  A charge by thirty men, led by Major Fry, drove a squadron of the enemy from the woods, immediately to our front.  Finding the enemy did not approach, Colonel Gregg mounted his command, and took up a position on the right of the line, and moved forward, until further progress was arrested by a dense woods, when he again dismounted his command and threw it forward on the enemy’s left flank, obliging him to change his position three times.

            The Regiment sustained no loss of either officers or men — one man, Private Durling, of “E” Company, was slightly wounded.  Major Fry, Captains Alexander and Kennedy, Lieutenants Snyder and Youngs, as well as all the men under my command, “see “Official Report,”) deserve great credit for the promptness they advanced under fire.

            Marched to Morrisville at sundown, and encamped.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

History of the 16th Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry, for the year ending October 31st, 1863.  Philadelphia: King & Baird, 1864.

Report of Col. J. Irvin Gregg

Posted in 16th Penn Cav, Correspondence US on November 25, 2008 by Craig Swain

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY,
March 18, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my regiment, the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, in the cavalry action near Kelly’s Ford on the 17th instant:

On arriving at the ford, I received an order to send forward all the axes in my regiment, and immediately dispatched 20 men, under command of First Lieut. A. J. Snyder. The party bore itself gallantly, and did good service in removing the blockade at the fording, and crossed with the First Rhode Island men. I desire to recommend to the favorable notice of the colonel commanding Sergeant [Samuel] McGowan, of Company H, Private [Edward] Claffrey, Company A, and Saddler F. J. Canman, Company I. These men have had charges preferred against them, and I trust their behavior in the late engagement will be taken into account in making Up their sentence.

The position occupied by my regiment was the extreme right of the line, with my right resting on the river, with my skirmishers thrown forward and deployed at a distance of 300 yards, and concealed from view by a wood of cedar trees and outbuildings. Shortly after the attack commenced on the left and center, I observed a large force of the enemy moving rapidly toward our right, evidently with a view of outflanking us, and asked for and obtained permission to dismount a portion of my command and occupy the buildings immediately in my front. This was not done a moment too soon, as the enemy were already entering the outer gate, when a volley from behind the houses drove them back. They soon rallied from behind some trees and out of carbine range, and, supposing from the maneuvers that it was their intention to dismount a portion of their men and gain our rear under cover of the bushes which lined the bank of the river, I dismounted the balance of my command, and threw my entire force some 300 yards in advance of the houses, under cover of a stone wall, and drove the enemy from the position. A charge of 30 men, led by Major Fry, drove a squadron of the enemy from the woods immediately in my front. Finding that the enemy did not approach, I mounted my command, and took up a position on the right of the line, and moved forward until farther progress was arrested by a dense woods, where I again dismounted my command, and threw it forward on the enemy’s left flank, obliging him to move his position three times.

I am happy to state that I did not lose a single officer or man from my command, and had but 1 man, Private George Derlin, slightly wounded.

Major Fry, Captains Kennedy and Alexander, Lieutenants Snyder and Young, as well as all the men under my command, deserve great credit for the promptness with which they advanced under fire.

I am not able to give an accurate account of the enemy’s killed and wounded. Fourteen dead bodies were counted on the right, and several others were seen to fall from their horses, apparently dead. The number of wounded must have been in the same proportion, as quite a large number of sabers were scattered over the ground. I apprehend that 30 killed and wounded from the effects of my fire is a very moderate estimate. The officers immediately in command of the dismounted men estimate a much larger number. I have also to report the following captured property:

Pistols    7

Sabers   9

Bridles   4

Carbines            1

Saddles 2

Horses   2

There were many sabers lying on the field, but being of so many patterns, and without scabbards, I did not deem them worth picking Up. Horses captured will be carried on the company report; the other property is in the hands of the men who captured it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. IRVIN GREGG,

Colonel, Commanding Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Col. J. B. MCINTOSH,

Second Brigade, Second Cavalry Division.

Report of Col. John B. McIntosh

Posted in 3rd Penn Cav, Correspondence US on November 25, 2008 by Craig Swain

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAV. BRIG., March 19, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report that this brigade, consisting of ——men, left camp at 9 o’clock on the morning of the 16th instant, and encamped that night with the division at Morrisville.

At 4 o’clock on the morning of the 17th instant I started with my brigade for Kelly’s Ford, and reached there by 6 a.m. The enemy was strongly posted on the southwest bank, and for a short time offered a stubborn resistance. It was at this juncture I detailed all the axmen from my brigade, under command of Lieutenant Gillmore, of the Third Pennsylvania Cavalry, who crossed with the advance guard, and cut away the trees the enemy had felled in order to obstruct the exit from the ford. After my brigade had crossed the river, and shortly after 12 m., the enemy made a sharp attack on the First Brigade, then advancing slowly through the woods. In obedience to the orders of the general, I deployed my brigade to the right, the Sixteenth Pennsylvania being on the extreme right. The enemy made an attempt to gain the cover of some houses on my right, when I immediately ordered Colonel Gregg to dismount a part of his command and throw them behind the houses, which he successfully accomplished, and, by a few well-directed volleys, caused them to retreat rapidly. I then formed my squadrons en échelon, and advanced slowly, driving the enemy completely from my front by well-directed volleys.

The enemy made no attempt to charge my brigade, nor did they appear in my front in any locality where I had an opportunity to charge them.

The loss of the brigade in killed, wounded, and missing is as follows :(*)

Third Pennsylvania Cavalry:

Officer wounded 1

Enlisted man wounded     1

Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry:

Officers wounded            2

Enlisted men wounded      4

Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry:

Enlisted man wounded     1

[J. B. McINTOSH,

Col. Third Pa. Cav., Comdg. Second Brig., Second Div.]

Lieut. C. F. TROWBRIDGE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Cav. Div.